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Thread: My Anti-Feminist Sociology Essay

  1. #1
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    My Anti-Feminist Sociology Essay

    Hey, Everyone.

    I started being red-pilled while I started University, and Sociology, with its heavy Feminist influence in curricula, was not easy to go through. Knowing that there was a huge likelihood I would be shut down or demonised for saying anything critical of Feminism paralysed me.

    I learnt the hard way that when I wasn't able to say what I was thinking, I could either say nothing at all, or would start to get physically sick. So, I finally bought the bullet and wrote what I was thinking, and fuck it felt good.

    I thought I'd share the essay in case anyone else might get the same satisfaction reading it as I did writing it. (Sorry the bibliograph

    Essay Question:
    Which of the following topics have you found most interesting this semester? Justify your answer with reference to the theoretical aspects discussed throughout the course AND its real-world implications.
    - Family life.
    - Education.
    - Work and leisure.
    - Health and the body


    Answer:

    All the listed topics were interesting, particularly education and the textbooks’ references to the gender revolution (pg. 163)[1] and underperformance of boys. This is relevant to the clash between Feminism & Men’s Rights Activists (MRAs) on university campuses, evident prior to protests against the Red Pill Documentary screenings across the country (Siobhan Ryan, 2017). The documentary was accused of homophobia and transphobia by University of Sydney Queer[2] activists (Siobhan Ryan, 2017) despite the films content revealing otherwise. On the contrary, prominent MRA leaders have publicly welcomed gay men (Elam, 2010; Esmay) and transgendered women (Straughan, 2014). This discrepancy questions the validity of the overlap between Queer & Feminist politics and by extension Safe Spaces in educational institutions. This is critically discussed through theoretical analysis of aspects of criticisms of Internalism (pg. 164), transfer of functions (pg. 109), medicalisation (pg.286) and gendered emotional labour (pg.163).

    Safe Spaces were originally conceived in queer bars in New York around the 1960s during the gay liberation movement as a response to police harassment and in the 70s were later adopted by Feminist organisations to combat misogyny (Harris, 2015; Kenney, 2001). Today they typically exist within university institutions amongst autonomous queer and/or women’s groups to address concerns of hate speech and harassment, but have carried over into other areas too, such as in primary and secondary education. The influence of Feminist theory that portrays men & boys as advantaged over women is common within the culture of these spaces.

    Wide application of Safe Spaces in educational institutions took place over the same time period as the gender revolution in education (pg. 163), a concept that describes the underperformance of boys in prior to the 1990’s. Today, more women than men complete university degrees -also within in STEM fields - in Australia (Munro, 2016; Statistics, 2016). Since tertiary education is mostly undertaken by those from privileged higher socio-economic backgrounds and safe spaces exist primarily on university campuses and in gentrified urban areas, Safe Spaces and concepts of ‘male privilege’ can be understood as a product of the cultural elite. The disconnection from working class culture is evident in analysing Feminist concepts in Work & Leisure of gendered emotional labour.

    Feminist concepts of emotional labour (pg. 199) argue that there lies a disproportionate burden on women in stress related occupations e.g. within the service industry. Applying this logic, men are correspondingly understood as burdened with jobs in manual labour, typically more dangerous work and the epitome of cultural conceptions of the working class. This is to flippantly disregard the almost completely male victims of workplace related deaths & injuries (Statistics, 2014). A counterargument to this within the framework of gendered emotional labour might pose that women suffer with corresponding harms equal than or greater to men in suffering in regards to mental health. Objective analysis suggests this is incorrect, considering high rates of male suicide have been linked to workplace related stress (Milner, 2017). This suggests instead that gendered emotional labour overburdens men, challenging the Feminist narrative that men who - actually manage to – complete university degrees are advantaged over women in employment opportunities. Such an idea of ‘male privilege’ has nonetheless carried over into Queer Politics and safe spaces, despite how the gender-pay-gap shows gay men and lesbian women earning similar wages[3] (Nauze, 2015) – lesbian women earn more than straight women.

    The cultural prevalence of ‘male privilege’ on university campuses and its reinforcement within Safe Spaces can be seen as its institutionalisation within education, and hence is an educational model. From the standpoint of criticism of Internalism (pg. 164), it projects a passive model (pg. 164) onto disabled students diagnosed with learning and developmental conditions, namely Attention Deficit Disorder [ADHD] and Asperger’s Syndrome [ASD], predominately male (Health, 2000; Williams et al., 2008). ADHD & ASD diagnoses are typically made in response to perceived antisocial behaviour and underperformance within education.

    Educational institutions can be criticised as failing to make distinctions between characteristics of antisocial behaviour and normal male behaviour, medicalising (pg. 286) students using Feminist influences on education models. This is to impose a passive model (pg. 165) on boys as disabled rather than understanding them as hindered due to misunderstandings of typical masculine behaviour. The suffering of those diagnosed can be seen as a result of negative public discourse (pg. 286) characterising men and boys as ‘toxic, dysfunctional, aggressive, depressed, burnt out’ (Horton-Salway, 2011). This is particularly concerning for males in education under the Safe Schools Program, which has a curriculum relying heavily to research referenced by Feminist scholars with mentions of gendered ‘dominance’ and with concepts or ‘privilege’ (Training, 2016). Safe Schools & Safe Spaces in educational institutions seem inadequate in terms of supporting the Queer community, since it includes gay men who fall within the demographic underperforming in education.

    Safe Spaces are frequently used to address family rejection, such as in youth organisations (Kerry H. Robinson, 2014). The replacement of gay men from one unsupportive environment to another raises the concept of the transfer of functions (pg. 109), which describes the replacement of family with institutions. Compounding this with the discussion of medicalisation (pg. 286), father absence has been linked to ADHD diagnoses (Pfiffner, McBurnett & Rathouz, 2001), which heightens concerns for the educational performance of gay men from unstable families with ADHD. Educational institutions should also take note of problems relating to performance in boys with video game addiction, particularly in those diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome who are reported to be significantly affected (Mazurek & Wenstrup, 2013). Concerns of online harassment by strangers as suffered predominately by boys should also be a considered criticism supplementary to any inclusion of topics relating to Feminist theories on gender in video games (Duggan, 2014).



    [1]Textbook References: All bold text marks theoretical aspects of the relevant essay topics within the 5th Edition Sociology Textbook (Van Krieken et al., 2013) referenced with bracketed page numbers. Example: Theoretical Aspect (pg. #)

    [2]‘Queer’ rather than ‘LGBTQIA+’ will be used throughout this essay, since they arguably refer to the same people. There is a noticeable linguistic discomfort from reciting the acronym which makes it difficult to remember amongst those unfamiliar the community, which I’m particularly concerned encourages a disconnect along socioeconomic and racial lines. Informing my decision is a judgement that these concerns outweigh relatively mild criticisms noticeable against the abandonment of the acronym.


    [3]The Gender Wage-Gap is commonly referred to by Feminists with heavy criticism on models of analysis. I have found no such debate of this in regards to the ‘Gay Wage Gap’. Given the seemingly Feminist influence of the study, it is reasonable to assume certain controls were not applied to this study [such as selection bias]. Reference to this research was included from the perspective of a Feminist counterargument that I argue is prevalent in Queer politics and has been included for that purpose alone.

    BIBLIOGRAPHY:

    Textbook:

    Van Krieken, R, Habibis, D, Smith, P, Hutchins, B, Martin, G & Maton, K 2013, Sociology, Pearson Higher Education AU.https://books.google.com.au/books?id=Zy_iBAAAQBAJ

    Sources:

    Duggan, M 2014, Online Harassment, viewed 28/7/2017, http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/10/2...ne-harassment/
    Elam, P 2010, A Voice for Gay Men, viewed 29/7/2017, https://www.avoiceformen.com/a-voice...e-for-gay-men/
    Esmay, D 2015, Gays Against Feminism: Because gay people are not your property, feminists, viewed 29/7/2017, https://www.avoiceformen.com/feminis...rty-feminists/
    Harris, M 2015, What’s a ‘safe space’? A look at the phrase's 50-year history, viewed 30/7/2017, http://fusion.kinja.com/what-s-a-saf...-hi-1793852786
    Australian Department of Health 2000, 5 Depressive disorder, conduct disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Australian Government.http://www.health.gov.au/internet/pu...pubs-m-young-5
    Horton-Salway, M 2011, 'Repertoires of ADHD in UK newspaper media', Health:, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 533-549.http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/...63459310389626
    Kenney, M 2001, Mapping gay LA: The intersection of place and politics, Temple University Press
    Kerry H. Robinson, DND, Cristyn Davies, Dr Peter Bansel, Dr Georgia Ovenden 2014, 'Issues Facing Young Australians Who Are Gender Variant and
    Sexuality Diverse', Growing Up Queer
    .http://www.youngandwellcrc.org.au/
    Mazurek, MO & Wenstrup, C 2013, 'Television, Video Game and Social Media Use Among Children with ASD and Typically Developing Siblings', Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, vol. 43, no. 6, pp. 1258-1271.http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-012-1659-9
    Milner, APS, Matthew J. Phd; Pirkis, Jane Phd; Chastang, Jean-François Phd; Niedhammer, Isabelle Phd; Lamontagne, Anthony D. Scd 2017, 'Low Control and High Demands at Work as Risk Factors for Suicide: An Australian National Population-Level Case-Control Study', Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 79, no. 3, pp. 358-364
    Munro, K 2016, 'More women than men complete postgraduate STEM degrees in NSW', The Sydney Morning Herald.http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/more-women...04-grumyf.html
    Nauze, AL 2015, 'Sexual orientation–based wage gaps in Australia: The potential role of discrimination and personality', The Economic and Labour Relations Review, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 60-81.http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/...35304615570806
    Pfiffner, LJ, Mcburnett, K & Rathouz, PJ 2001, 'Father Absence and Familial Antisocial Characteristics', Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 357-367.https://link.springer.com/article/10...:1010421301435
    Siobhan Ryan, MT 2017, 'Protesters clash, one arrested, outside The Red Pill screening', Honi Soit.http://honisoit.com/2017/05/proteste...ill-screening/
    Australian Bureau of Statistics 2014, 6324.0 - Work-Related Injuries, Australia, JUL 2013 TO JUN 2014, Government, A.http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/6324.0
    Statistics, ABO 2016, Education.http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/by Subject/4125.0~Feb 2016~Main Features~Education~100
    Straughan, K 2014, Are Men Obsolete? Q & A: Karen Straughan Speaks at Ryerson University, viewed Access Date, https://youtu.be/vagVf5cf-V0?t=39m54s
    Department of Education and Training 2016, 'Teaching for Social and Emotional Learning and Respectful Relationships', Resilience Rights & Respectful Relationships.
    Williams, K, Macdermott, S, Ridley, G, Glasson, EJ & Wray, JA 2008, 'The prevalence of autism in Australia. Can it be established from existing data?', Journal of paediatrics and child health, vol. 44, no. 9, pp. 504-510
    Last edited by Cam_Schwz; 07-08-2017 at 05:27 AM. Reason: Fixed in-text References and tidied presrentation

  2. #2
    Senior Member voidspawn's Avatar
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    Can't say I can follow it all, or much. Hopefully Manalysis will feedback on it, he's good at academic analysis.

    Good for you, and I hope you did find it positively cathartic. What was the response to the essay?
    "...especially when it comes to communication, it can be observed, if it is not a negotiation it's a war."
    Quote Originally Posted by menrppl2 View Post
    oh give me a home where the hookers do roam, and the femsocialists aren't on tv all gay
    where seldom is heard a man demonizing word, and the skies aren't snowy all day
    Quote Originally Posted by menrppl2 View Post
    Can't live with em, life is great without them.

  3. #3
    Senior Member mr_e's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by voidspawn View Post
    What was the response to the essay?

    As if you have to ask...
    FEMINISM is a HATE GROUP - Feminists are HATEFUL PEOPLE
    It's time to call it out for what it is.



    The World of Men - Men's Rights / MGTOW / Sites of Interest to Men

    http://forums.avoiceformen.com/showt...nterest-to-Men

  4. #4
    Very interesting Essay.

    For unrelated reasons, it caught my attention that in feminist language toxic masculinity is also considered "dysfunctional"... a word that I have recently found in another somewhat related topic.

    Indeed the word "dysfunctional" carry some medical air to it, almost like a diagnose... Any idea what is their definition of a functional man?

    Some time ago I study the relationship between the absence of fathers and child obesity... however the point you make here is even more interesting as you indicate a relationship between the absence of fathers and ADHD... revealing that society have cheat the youth by claiming that there is something unhealthy on the mind of the boys, instead of considering that there is something lacking on their uprising.

    How much of an advantage, or compensation do you think the gays get in this so called "safe zones"?

  5. #5
    How much of an advantage, or compensation do you think the gays get in this so called "safe zones"?
    About this question:

    I ask because I have try to track the success rate of organizations that offer part time replacement for fathers... this is to replace a father with a 2 hours per week volunteer, And though they don't offer much data, for example the percentage of fatherless boys going to jail Vs the percentage of fatherless boys with somewhat substitute fathers goign to jail.. my theory is that it does not really makes any significant impact on the life of the boys.

    So even though the institutions now try to compensate the absent father, within this "safe zones", what is their result?

    I follow your Pfiffner link and found this line:

    "The heightened antisocial behavior in children associated with absent biological fathers was not mitigated by presence of stepfathers and was not accounted for by lower SES."

    Leading to confirm my theory... however I have to ask, in your opinion, do you think this Transfer of Functions, from family to state, will be able produce positive results?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Manalysis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cam_Schwz View Post
    Hey, Everyone.
    Hi,

    I heard my name mentioned ...

    I started being red-pilled while I started University, and Sociology, with its heavy Feminist influence in curricula, was not easy to go through. Knowing that there was a huge likelihood I would be shut down or demonised for saying anything critical of Feminism paralysed me.

    I learnt the hard way that when I wasn't able to say what I was thinking, I could either say nothing at all, or would start to get physically sick. So, I finally bought the bullet and wrote what I was thinking, and fuck it felt good.
    Good for you. Well done. We shall see if Fortune favours the bold; her being a woman, and all ...
    Like others, I'm also curious to hear how this went. I hope they don't make you bite the farm

    I thought I'd share the essay in case anyone else might get the same satisfaction reading it as I did writing it.
    Thx for writing, and sharing.

    [SIZE=3]Essay Question:
    Which of the following topics have you found most interesting this semester? Justify your answer with reference to the theoretical aspects discussed throughout the course AND its real-world implications.
    - Family life.
    - Education.
    - Work and leisure.
    - Health and the body


    Answer:
    Good stuff. Lots of info, and new info. I didn't know about the queer "safe spaces", amongst other things.
    Can't find anything to put my finger on, really, technically speaking. So, good job.

    Some words about language, though. Not so much because of the essay, just Academia stuff in general.
    The essay question doesn't give you much to work with. Very open ended, i.e. difficult to write something pointed ... or ...
    You would probably not be rewarded for having a tight focus on one clearly delimited problem or question, which is how one would get real work done.
    However, once you've been forced into such a shotgun approach, I think you did well, managing to cover a lot of topics.
    Of course precisely that trait excludes memorable headlines or slogans, but that couldn't be helped.

    Academic writing is its own genre, and one has to inflate the language with polysyllabic jargon, but in the interest of your future career ... the people who mark papers like these are sick and tired of marking papers like these, and if you can write something that is fresh, vivid, even a little daring, and above all brief, they'll mark you up just for that.
    But even if you don't aim for fresh and vivid, it's always good to strive for clarity. People who talk about this always say "strive", because you never get all the way there; but at least, you know, stretching your hands through the bars of the prison of language ... you'd be making an effort which will reward you with better writing and eventually also with better thinking.
    To put it plain and simple, a word is the label of a thought, and a thought is the label of an experience (very roughly ...).
    So ideally, one should be able to take any text and pick it apart to find not only thoughts, but also the preceding experiences. Kinda.
    So take a sentence like "This is relevant to the clash between Feminism & Men’s Rights Activists (MRAs) on university campuses, evident prior to protests against the Red Pill Documentary screenings across the country". Where does the "this is relevant" come from? (Perhaps an echo of the essay question's subliminal suggestion of "reference" + "real life"?) The reader knows that you're pointing the finger at something, that your message is "I'm going to mention something", but what is the experience component of this phrase? Why not write "We see this in ..."?
    If imprecision goes too far, the writing becomes sloppy; for the record, your's isn't, otoh what there is of slight nebulosity is due to such traces of roundabout writing. Not all the expressions have found the absolute, unsurpassable accuracy of unimprovable clarity, there's still some wiggle room. I know this is an incredible nitpick, but if you yourself can get into the habit of reading yourself that way, and tightening your writing, you're going to improve every time you write another line. Which is a neat trick, actually.

    So ... write more

    M

  7. #7
    good job, you disputed so many concepts with simple logic.... how was it received is my question? same as other's.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheNarrator View Post
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