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The Gender Gap and Sexism In The Justice System In The UK

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  • The Gender Gap and Sexism In The Justice System In The UK

    I did not know where to place this thread on the forum. I hope this section is OK. I wrote this very quickly. Its a bit messy/amateurish but I hope you find it informing.

    In the UK conviction rates and prison sentences are lower for women than they are for men for all crimes without exception from murder to sexual assaults (1).

    In 2015 the conviction rate for murder for women was roughly 200% lower than that for men (2) and 300% lower than the national average (3).

    Government reports on this gender gap in the justice system are bias often written based on guidance from feminist organisations (4a). These reports dismiss issues affecting men and accentuate those affecting women which creates an atmosphere where women are made to appear as though they are disproportional victims as compared men and this in turn fits in neatly with the feminist agenda to prioritise aid for women over men (5), this despite the fact that men are in greater disadvantage and in need of more support.

    Men are twice as likely to be victims of violence (by an acquaintance or stranger) than women in this country (6, 4). Despite this the government here (as I am sure is the case with every other feminised country) focuses its entire resources on gender initiatives for women whilst neglecting men. This unjustified, sexist culture of gynocentrism* is instigated and promoted by institutionalised feminism.

    The low conviction rates and lenient sentences for women are themselves caused by a deep culture of sexism and favourable treatment for women on societal, cultural and governmental levels.

    Examples follow:

    Direct orders to judges by the government to treat women more leniently than men (7):

    The argument used to justify these orders are that women do not commit violent crimes as often as men (11) but that does not explain why they deserve lighter sentences for equal crimes. Institutionalised feminism also uses the argument that women often have children to look after and so deserve lighter sentences because otherwise it would be unfair on the child (11) but this same non-sensical privilege is not provided to men when they have children or families to look after. In fact the orders to the judges are strictly based on gender irrespective of the circumstances surrounding the 'indictee’s' life. It is preferential treatment purely based on gender. This by its very definition is sexism.

    Another example of sexism on a governmental, judicial level is that of women not being indictable for serious crimes such as rape. In such cases they are instead charged with lesser crimes, which carry lower sentences. I will be writing a thread detailing this issue soon.

    Evidence is also found in bias governmental reports such as the one cited above that are written based on the guidance of feminist organisation, which argue in favour of favourable treatment for women (4). As well as programmes to reduce imprisonment of women within the UK (8) with no male equivalent despite men making up the majority of the prison population, because according to our government the idea of women in the penal system is a ‘disgrace’ (9). Not only this but thanks to our feminist home secretary Amber Rudd, as of 2013, we now have a Minister of Women’s Prisons, Helen Grant, with no male role equivalent….The justification for this role? “separating out (women’s prisons) from other prisons (men's prisons) so there is a line of responsibility” (13). Responsibility to furthering female privilege within the justice system that is. There is also the ring-fenced budgets amounting to millions spent every year on organisations aimed at furthering women’s interests within the justice system (13).

    Sexism is also clear on a cultural level here in the west. Our culture refuses to accept the idea that women commit crimes. Our culture wrongly preaches that “women do not do things like this" (10). Our culture shames men and boys for reporting women for crimes of violence. Men in the UK are twice less likely to report having experienced abuse from their female partners (4) than women of their male partners. There are examples of cases in the west of sexual assaults that have been dismissed by judges because the judge thought that women do not do crimes like this (10). You can find this sexist dismissive culture in all levels of authority from the police to the high courts. Such culture greatly impacts the justice system and its outcomes.

    Let me give you another example of a cultural sexism that serves to reduce conviction rates and prison sentences for women. I am going to give you this example in the form of a question.

    If I show you a video of a woman being subjected to hurt and one of a man being subjected to hurt both in the exact same way, would you react to both videos similarly? I am willing to bet you that you wont. I am willing to bet you that you would feel outraged by the hurt afflicting the woman more so than you would the man. We are taught from childhood that ‘violence against women’ is wrong and we are taught to give respect to women, even those who do not deserve respect, yet we are not taught this same level of respect to men who suffer greater violence and disrespect on all levels of society and culture. This culture impacts judicial outcomes greatly.

    Los Angeles District Attorney, Thomas L. Woolwine Nov. 25. 1923:

    “There can be no question that it is more difficult to convict a woman for any offence than a man.

    The reason it is well night impossible to punish women for crimes of violence in particular is simple: It is because they are women, and because sex plays a vital part in every such trial.

    Men are innately loath to punish women. Women naturally arouse a feeling of false chivalry in men which allays and tempers their judgment upon the evidence.

    It is more difficult for a prosecutor to overcome this powerful factor than it is to convince a jury upon the state of facts presented.”

    Sexism and female privilege in our justice systems in the west is so clear that even feminists have concluded in their research that the justice system is clearly bias in favour of women (12). What is most comical about this feminist finding is that in this study (12) they initially set out to prove a feminist theory called “evil women hypothesis”. In this Hypothesis feminists claim that women are more harshly treated by the justice system than men but in setting out to prove this theory of female victimhood they found the opposite to be true.

    But hang on a second. Could other factors such as for example men having previous criminal records (4) be playing a part in the lower conviction rates and more lenient sentencing that women receive as compared to men? Studies conducted to investigate this question have found that “even after controlling for (these) legal characteristics a substantial gap in sentencing outcomes remains… (and that) extralegal characteristics do not help to close the gender gap… (and) when male and female defendants are examined separately, (the study found) that not all legal and extralegal factors weigh equally for male and female defendants“(14).

    There is a huge gender gap in the justice system that is caused by sexism and favourable treatment for women. Not just here in the UK but across the globe.

    We live in sexist societies that outright refuse to hold women accountable for their actions, where female criminals, rapists, pedophiles, murderers do not receive justice nor their victims, societies where women are in a clear state of privilege and working towards protecting and furthering this privilege whilst men are in a clear state of disadvantage and going from bad to worse thanks to this sexism.

    1. Figure A.06, page 13 - https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...n-cjs-2013.pdf
    2. https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...eandsexualoffe nces/yearendingmarch2015/chapter2homicide
    3. National average - https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...nviction-rates
    4. ‘Acknowledgements’ on page 4 - https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...n-cjs-2013.pdf ….refer to the acknowledgements in this report for (4a)
    5. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/wom...p-Britain.html
    6. https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...sexualoffences
    7. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...sentences.html
    8. http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/...2025314web.pdf
    9. http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/...prisonment.pdf
    10. http://abuseguardian.com/no-one-want...ale-sex-abuse/
    11. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/wom...s-prisons.html
    12. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/...57085111430214
    13. http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/...sard250313.pdf
    14. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/...87403412466877

    *Thank you Grumpy Old Man for introducing me to this term of which I had no idea before joining this forum.
    Last edited by Equity; 04-06-2017, 11:05 PM.

  • #2
    Equity, it's always a great pleasure to see an emerging MHRM writer and voice. I hope we can all encourage you and help you get your writing read by many.

    On the forums there is the Writer's Corner, which is probably the place to open this thread and invite people to help you polish this up into an article.

    It's also worth I think keeping it as a personal blog, which comes as a feature of your account. You can develop it and polish there, keep it as a draft or publish it or unpublish it. That also includes comments. Threads over time get buried. But my habit is when I know someone blogs I will look at their article list. And if they are participants in Writers Corner, it's a good reminder who blogs.

    People who can come up with good ideas for articles and have that investigative instinct, should definitely seriously consider pursuing being published on the main site, on other MRM sites and even in academia and mainstream. It's a good ambition and an incredibly valuable way to push forward for Men's Rights and make sure it can claim its rightful place as part of the history of the human rights movement.

    I think this is a good start, and is a big topic that you are going find difficult to nail in a single piece. I'd guess at least three pieces would be needed:

    1) Covering what gender gap statistics, court data and anecdotal evidence tell us about sexist bias against men in the UK court system. This seems to be what you've started. It's good idea to really establish this before looking at the causes of that sexist bias. Write as if you are writing for the uninformed, even the disinterested. On a forum it's very easy to write for this audience, and that's no bad thing for simple forum posts, but do also think about the ambition of being more widely published.

    2) Covering social bias and the roots of that social bias towards men accused or convicted of committing crimes. The value of this, which can include direct comparison to the treatment of females accused and convicted of committing crimes is about establishing a baseline for the reader. This can help you establish what is the results of differences between male and female criminal behaviour (types of crime, level of violence, extenuating circumstances), what results in from social bias and prejudice and is reflected as systemic bias - this would cover sentencing treatment of first offenders, treatment of prisoners and parolees, with a look at recidivism, impact of treatment differences between boys and girls, can even connect tendency to treat boys school work more harshly because they've 'misbehaved' in class (there's argument that this can roll forward to not only lowering their chances for a gainful employment fitting their potential, but also instead of correcting behaviour promote disrespect towards unfair authority / justify rebellious behaviour) the social reporting / social experiment type stuff like you include of course fits in here too. Note that this isn't an attempt to explore or answer the entirety of bias, but to bring it out to visibility. You can then compare what is behavioural, what is social perceptions, how the system is influenced and what is unexplained.

    3) Social and system bias due to feminism. This is where the ground work of not starting with a predetermined position pays off. The unexplained harshness towards males and leniency towards females can be exposed as being down to pressure from feminist groups. You can even use their own writing, data and articles making their arguments. That way you can place down the contentions that either a) feminism pressures for the harsh treatment of men and lenient treatment of women or b) the system is influenced towards leniency towards females because of feminist campaigns but continues with the regressive or even excessive harshness towards males as systemic bias. You can look then in conclusion at the spectrum between these two because you'd have established the bias is real. Either way in terms of impact of the piece it will add up to the same thing, even if feminist campaigns for things, that doesn't excuse the system (i.e. the officials and politicians) of their responsibility in enacting gender prejudice.

    It's important for a future quality writer to set standards for investigation which are based upon not constructing the case from just their own selection bias. Writing that can be dismissed as bias isn't effective except to those sharing that same bias. So going through the exploration even if you feel strongly that what is going to be revealed is your opening thesis, you should always take the position that 'I might prove myself wrong, or I might actually reveal something I did not expect.'

    As to polish and editing just be sure to call out for help with that when you need it. I'm sure there is plenty of skills here to help you, for sure I'd try to help, and I think the main site staff would probably be open to any requests too.
    Last edited by voidspawn; 04-04-2017, 04:51 PM.
    "...especially when it comes to communication, it can be observed, if it is not a negotiation it's a war."
    Originally posted by menrppl2
    Can't live with em, life is great without them.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by voidspawn View Post
      Equity, it's always a great pleasure to see an emerging MHRM writer and voice. I hope we can all encourage you and help you get your writing read by many.

      On the forums there is the Writer's Corner, which is probably the place to open this thread and invite people to help you polish this up into an article.

      It's also worth I think keeping it as a personal blog, which comes as a feature of your account. You can develop it and polish there, keep it as a draft or publish it or unpublish it. That also includes comments. Threads over time get buried. But my habit is when I know someone blogs I will look at their article list. And if they are participants in Writers Corner, it's a good reminder who blogs.
      Thank you voidspawn. Your comments are always encouraging and full of great advice. This Writer’s Corner and the blogs feature sound very interesting. I will try to make use of them.

      Clearly, a lot of thought and work has gone into this site/forum.

      Originally posted by voidspawn View Post
      People who can come up with good ideas for articles and have that investigative instinct, should definitely seriously consider pursuing being published on the main site, on other MRM sites and even in academia and mainstream. It's a good ambition and an incredibly valuable way to push forward for Men's Rights and make sure it can claim its rightful place as part of the history of the human rights movement.
      I’ve not really had time to hone the ideas in this thread into an article but I do think that this topic has potential...I researched it a few years ago and I've not really had the chance to make something of it. I've written about this issue before but very informally and on platforms where, like you stated in your comment, it eventually got buried. So this might be a good opportunity to maybe make something tangible out of this research.

      Originally posted by voidspawn View Post
      I think this is a good start, and is a big topic that you are going find difficult to nail in a single piece. I'd guess at least three pieces would be needed:
      Interesting. If it is done justice this topic can become lengthy. So maybe I should entertain expounding on it and perhaps dividing it into parts as you have suggested.

      Originally posted by voidspawn View Post
      1) Covering what gender gap statistics, court data and anecdotal evidence tell us about sexist bias against men in the UK court system. This seems to be what you've started. It's good idea to really establish this before looking at the causes of that sexist bias. Write as if you are writing for the uninformed, even the disinterested. On a forum it's very easy to write for this audience, and that's no bad thing for simple forum posts, but do also think about the ambition of being more widely published.
      I will try to restructure this work and maybe elaborate on certain areas and make others easier to understand. Publishing work is an interesting thought.

      Originally posted by voidspawn View Post
      2) Covering social bias and the roots of that social bias towards men accused or convicted of committing crimes. The value of this, which can include direct comparison to the treatment of females accused and convicted of committing crimes is about establishing a baseline for the reader. This can help you establish what is the results of differences between male and female criminal behaviour (types of crime, level of violence, extenuating circumstances), what results in from social bias and prejudice and is reflected as systemic bias - this would cover sentencing treatment of first offenders, treatment of prisoners and parolees, with a look at recidivism impact of treatment differences between boys and girls, can even connect tendency to treat boys school work more harshly because they've 'misbehaved' in class (there's argument that this can roll forward to not only lowering their chances for a gainful employment fitting their potential, but also instead of correcting behaviour promote disrespect towards unfair authority / justify rebellious behaviour) the social reporting / social experiment type stuff like you include of course fits in here too. Note that this isn't an attempt to explore or answer the entirety of bias, but to bring it out to visibility. You can then compare what is behavioural, what is social perceptions, how the system is influenced and what is unexplained.

      3) Social and system bias due to feminism. This is where the ground work of not starting with a predetermined position pays off. The unexplained harshness towards males and leniency towards females can be exposed as being down to pressure from feminist groups. You can even use their own writing, data and articles making their arguments. That way you can place down the contentions that either a) feminism pressures for the harsh treatment of men and lenient treatment of women or b) the system is influenced towards leniency towards females because of feminist campaigns but continues with the regressive or even excessive harshness towards males as systemic bias. You can look then in conclusion at the spectrum between these two because you'd have established the bias is real. Either way in terms of impact of the piece it will add up to the same thing, even if feminist campaigns for things, that doesn't excuse the system (i.e. the officials and politicians) of their responsibility in enacting gender prejudice.

      It's important for a future quality writer to set standards for investigation which are based upon not constructing the case from just their own selection bias. Writing that can be dismissed as bias isn't effective except to those sharing that same bias. So going through the exploration even if you feel strongly that what is going to be revealed is your opening thesis, you should always take the position that 'I might prove myself wrong, or I might actually reveal something I did not expect.'

      As to polish and editing just be sure to call out for help with that when you need it. I'm sure there is plenty of skills here to help you, for sure I'd try to help, and I think the main site staff would probably be open to any requests too.
      Thank you again for these gems.
      Last edited by Equity; 04-05-2017, 06:29 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Equity View Post
        I did not know where to place this thread on the forum. I hope this section is OK. I wrote this very quickly. Its a bit messy/amateurish but I hope you find it informing.

        In the UK conviction rates and prison sentences are lower for women than they are for men for all crimes without exception from murder to sexual assaults (1).

        In 2015 the conviction rate for murder for women was roughly 200% lower than that for men (2) and 300% lower than the national average (3).

        Extremely well done! I hope you are planning to submit that to the main site for publication!
        FEMINISM is a HATE GROUP - Feminists are HATEFUL PEOPLE
        It's time to call it out for what it is.
        == REJECT FEMINISM. EMBRACE HUMANITY ==


        The World of Men - Men's Rights / MGTOW / Sites of Interest to Men
        http://forums.avoiceformen.com/showt...nterest-to-Men

        Comment


        • #5
          Some years ago, my best friend in Mexico, a former medical examiner for 22 years, told me of a crime he was once involved with.

          A man disappeared. Quite some time later, his body, partly consumed by animals was found in the woods. But, both legs were broken below the knees. So, violence was assumed.

          It took several years but they found the culprits, a married couple from another state.

          When my friend interviewed her, she admitted they had done it. The deceased, whenever he got drunk, would rattle on how rich he was and how much money he had. Pure BS.

          All the local people knew it was just drunk talk. The out of state couple thought it was true So, she invited him to go with her in her car to get scrod. The husband sneaked up, opened the door and smashed his legs with a baseball bat so he could not resist. When they found out he was nearly penniless, he was murdered and his body dragged off.

          It took several years but they found them, as stated. Based on the woman's confession, conviction was almost certain. They brought in the husband to my friend's office. he talked tough. She is crazy; we did no such thing. He was very cold and harsh.

          But, when he told he was going to be in prison for 40 years, he showed signs of stress.

          In the USA, as you all well know, she would have been out immediately or after a very short sentence.

          She got exactly the same 40 years sentence he got.

          Yeah, she might have been afraid not to obey him. Maybe. But, if she preferred to help kill a man rather than take a beating, then she belongs in prison. No excuses accepted.

          My wife had a cousin who years ago was assistant warden in a woman's prison. When I met her, I asked how sentencing for women worked in Mexico. She said women got the same exact sentence for the same offense as men get.

          Comment


          • #6
            Nice work senor Equity.
            I hope it hits the main main page soon....be a nice follow on from Jay Fayza's video
            "Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one" - Charles Mackay

            And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee. - Donne

            "What we are seeing in this headless misandry is a grand display of the Tyranny of the Underdog: 'I am a wretchedly longstanding victim; therefore I own no burden of adult accountability, nor need to honor any restraint against my words and actions. In fact, all efforts to restrain me are only further proof of my oppressed condition.'
            "It is the most perfect trump-card against accountable living ever devised." - Gladden Schrock

            "What remains for most men in modern life is a world of expectation without reward, burden without honor and service without self" - Paul Elam

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by polite_disagreement View Post
              Some years ago, my best friend in Mexico, a former medical examiner for 22 years, told me of a crime he was once involved with.

              A man disappeared. Quite some time later, his body, partly consumed by animals was found in the woods. But, both legs were broken below the knees. So, violence was assumed.

              It took several years but they found the culprits, a married couple from another state.

              When my friend interviewed her, she admitted they had done it. The deceased, whenever he got drunk, would rattle on how rich he was and how much money he had. Pure BS.

              All the local people knew it was just drunk talk. The out of state couple thought it was true So, she invited him to go with her in her car to get scrod. The husband sneaked up, opened the door and smashed his legs with a baseball bat so he could not resist. When they found out he was nearly penniless, he was murdered and his body dragged off.

              It took several years but they found them, as stated. Based on the woman's confession, conviction was almost certain. They brought in the husband to my friend's office. he talked tough. She is crazy; we did no such thing. He was very cold and harsh.

              But, when he told he was going to be in prison for 40 years, he showed signs of stress.

              In the USA, as you all well know, she would have been out immediately or after a very short sentence.

              She got exactly the same 40 years sentence he got.

              Yeah, she might have been afraid not to obey him. Maybe. But, if she preferred to help kill a man rather than take a beating, then she belongs in prison. No excuses accepted.

              My wife had a cousin who years ago was assistant warden in a woman's prison. When I met her, I asked how sentencing for women worked in Mexico. She said women got the same exact sentence for the same offense as men get.


              That is what is needed here. Truth in sentencing, equality in sentencing. Make it shorter for him, or longer for her. Either way. Make it equal.
              FEMINISM is a HATE GROUP - Feminists are HATEFUL PEOPLE
              It's time to call it out for what it is.
              == REJECT FEMINISM. EMBRACE HUMANITY ==


              The World of Men - Men's Rights / MGTOW / Sites of Interest to Men
              http://forums.avoiceformen.com/showt...nterest-to-Men

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by mr_e View Post
                Extremely well done! I hope you are planning to submit that to the main site for publication!
                Thank you Mr_E. You are too kind. Believe it or not, this is just the tip of the ice-burg. There are far worse gender gaps and more blatant examples of bias and sexism here in the UK still. Stuff that make this issue of the justice system look like nothing.

                This post of mine has too many holes in it and it is very very informal and rough. It needs A LOT of work but I'm going to take voidspawn's advice and your encouraging comments and start working on it as well as other ideas in the blog/article section of this forum. I would greatly appreciate any input from you guys.

                Originally posted by MatrixTransform View Post
                Nice work senor Equity.
                I hope it hits the main main page soon....be a nice follow on from Jay Fayza's video
                Thank you MatrixTransform.

                Originally posted by polite_disagreement View Post
                Some years ago, my best friend in Mexico, a former medical examiner for 22 years, told me of a crime he was once involved with.

                A man disappeared. Quite some time later, his body, partly consumed by animals was found in the woods. But, both legs were broken below the knees. So, violence was assumed.

                It took several years but they found the culprits, a married couple from another state.

                When my friend interviewed her, she admitted they had done it. The deceased, whenever he got drunk, would rattle on how rich he was and how much money he had. Pure BS.

                All the local people knew it was just drunk talk. The out of state couple thought it was true So, she invited him to go with her in her car to get scrod. The husband sneaked up, opened the door and smashed his legs with a baseball bat so he could not resist. When they found out he was nearly penniless, he was murdered and his body dragged off.

                It took several years but they found them, as stated. Based on the woman's confession, conviction was almost certain. They brought in the husband to my friend's office. he talked tough. She is crazy; we did no such thing. He was very cold and harsh.

                But, when he told he was going to be in prison for 40 years, he showed signs of stress.

                In the USA, as you all well know, she would have been out immediately or after a very short sentence.

                She got exactly the same 40 years sentence he got.

                Yeah, she might have been afraid not to obey him. Maybe. But, if she preferred to help kill a man rather than take a beating, then she belongs in prison. No excuses accepted.

                My wife had a cousin who years ago was assistant warden in a woman's prison. When I met her, I asked how sentencing for women worked in Mexico. She said women got the same exact sentence for the same offense as men get.
                Though I do not think that there is such a thing as a country that is completely outside the realm of feminist influence, its always interesting to read stories from parts of the world that have yet to become institutionally feminised.

                Originally posted by mr_e View Post
                That is what is needed here. Truth in sentencing, equality in sentencing. Make it shorter for him, or longer for her. Either way. Make it equal.
                That is indeed what is needed but instead we have the opposite happening....feminised countries are constantly working towards furthering female privilege and male disadvantage in their justice systems.
                Last edited by Equity; 04-07-2017, 04:11 AM.

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